GP News

Welcome to our newsletter for London’s General Practitioners and your teams. As one of the largest and busiest ambulance services in the world, serving a growing population of over 8.6 million people, we want to keep you up to date with our work, challenges and achievements , as well as the latest news in your areas.

Every quarter we produce five GP newsletters, one for each of the five areas of London, filled with what we’re up to and our latest developments to improve patient care. Click on your local area below to find out what’s happening near you.

If you have a question about our GP newsletter or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]


Read the latest issue of our GP newsletter for your area:

  • North west London

    What’s happening in your area?

    Kings Fund quality improvementNorth west London (NWL) Sustainable Transformation Partnership (STP) is focusing on the 10 lessons for NHS Leaders – in particular upon relationships and culture by enabling and supporting frontline staff to engage in quality improvement working as a system. In helping to achieve this the STP has:

    • Been successful in the implementation and enabling of a shadowing scheme for London Ambulance Service (LAS) staff with our Rapid Response Teams, with over 100 staff participating in the schemes since the start of 2019 and continuing throughout the year.
    • Held local improvement events throughout the sector with the first conference event held at Brent. This involved the Brent Community of Practice, which consists of LAS staff of all grades, collaborating with two Rapid Response Teams, STARRS and Harrow Rapid Response, Mental Health SPA, Frailty Teams and End of Life Care specialists. This enabled the STP to break down organisational silos and improve staff knowledge and confidence by enabling conversations with us and external stakeholders.
    • Collaboration continues to improve in north west London with improved links between local management teams and their providers such as Emergency Departments and Appropriate Care Pathways (ACP) by ensuring regular meetings occur at a local level and channels of communication are open and well defined.

    The Falls Pioneer Service in north west London commended on 11 March. It involves a non-emergency Transport Service (NETS) ambulance and an ambulance car, staffed by a NETS member and a Paramedic, focussing on elderly falls to improve prevention of admission into hospital and improved patient outcomes. A trial was also completed in Hillingdon for our staff to directly refer non-injured fallers who would benefit from a multidisciplinary team assessment 24 to 48 hours from referral as part of a holistic and systems approach towards patient care.

     


    Clinical news

    Macmillam end of life care team

    End of Life Care teamSince August 2018, the charity, Macmillan, have been funding a two year programme to improve the palliative and end of life care service we provide to our patients. Our end of life care team who are delivering this scheme includes a nurse consultant, paramedic leads and an evaluation lead. The aim of the programme is to:

    • Enhance staff knowledge, confidence and wellbeing
    • Enhance patient and family/carer experience
    • Reduce inappropriate resuscitation attempts
    • Reduce inappropriate hospital conveyance
    • Enhance the quality of care provision

    From July this year, the team will be implementing an End of Life Care Coordinator network at each of our 18 ambulance station groups across London who will focus on improving this care provision at a local level. If you would like to get in touch with your local coordinator, please email [email protected]

    Coordinate my care

    Matt Hancock CMCCoordinate my Care (CMC) is now the only way we can access a patient’s care plan. If a 999 call is made the ambulance clinicians attending are notified that the plan is available to view, based on the patient’s address. CMC is suitable for any patient you feel would benefit from their care plan being communicated to our ambulance and control room staff as well as NHS 111 clinicians.

    Ambulance crews are able to view a patient’s care plan on scene, which can provide valuable information to guide clinical decision making. CMC is vital for ambulance clinicians as it provides key information about a patient that they will often have no pre-existing knowledge about. Ambulance clinicians can view your records of treatment escalation plans, patient’s wishes and important decisions that have been made, such as DNACPR status. This information can prevent inappropriate emergency department admissions and enables patients to be supported according to their needs and wishes.

    Since 1 April, we now hold all key clinical information about patients on CMC records and we no longer accept Patient Specific Protocols (PSP). We are currently checking all existing PSPs, and that process will be completed by 1st July 2019. GPs will be informed if we discover a patient who requires a PSP to be migrated to a CMC plan.

    Click here for more CMC training and guidance. 


    London Ambulance Service news

    Behind the Sirens podcast

    They’re on the roads 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, responding to over 9 million Londoners, but what really goes on behind the sirens? From major incidents to prank callers, our new podcast gives listeners a peak into the day to day lives of staff in one of the world’s busiest ambulance services.

    Join our host, Andrew as he delves into what happens behind the sirens at London Ambulance Service. He meets with our mental health team, chats with some of our paramedics and delves into what life is like in our 999 control room.

    You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts, or you can read more about the podcast and each episode here.

     

     

    Consultant Midwife receives national midwifery honour

    Amanda Mansfield Royal College MidwivesAmanda Mansfield, our Consultant Midwife, has received a national award from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) for her contribution to midwifery. Amanda received the honour at a ceremony at the Royal college of Midwives Education Conference in Bath and is the first midwife working in pre-hospital care to receive the fellowship.

    Commenting on receiving the award, Amanda said: “I feel so honoured to be the first pre-hospital midwife to be recognised with a RCM fellowship.”

    “For many women, pregnancy and birth are normal life events, however occasionally emergencies do occur and they need to be managed quickly to ensure the safety of both mother and baby. It has been a great privilege to work on developing this emergency care and also help improve the support and training for emergency service staff in this area.”

    Amanda leads a team of midwives who have developed and delivered pioneering educational resources for emergency services staff – from those working in the control room to patient facing clinicians. This improved training is helping to make sure mums and babies receive the best care for their needs.

    Amanda also led on the development and implementation of a pan-London pre-hospital Maternity Assessment and Screening tool, enabling clinicians to recognise when women who become unwell during pregnancy require emergency assistance.

    Amanda has been a midwife for over 30 years. Before her current role she worked as a strategic midwifery and maternity leader at the Royal Free Hospital in London and at Stoke Mandeville, Wycombe and Wexham Park Hospitals.


    Get in touch

    If you’d like to get in touch with us, or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]

  • North central London

    What’s happening in your area?

    Red Bag scheme for care homes

    TRed Bag schemehe Red Bag scheme, which ensures a resident or patient who is conveyed to hospital from their care home has all their personal effects, notes and medications placed inside a ‘Red Bag’ to take with them, can now be found in most care homes within north central London. We’ve advertised this to our staff so they’re all aware of the processes involved and the part we play in this process. Thanks to the Red Bag we have seen an increase in patient experience while they’re in hospital, and initial reports show a reduced length of stay in some cases.

    This bag is a medium sized zip bag which the care home staff prepare before our crews, and is then taken with the patient to hospital and handed over to the receiving team. Once the patient is on the ward, the nursing team will have access to the Red Bag and everything within it. This scheme has demonstrated an increase in patient experience while an in-patient, and initial reports are indicating a reduced length of stay in some cases.

    Once the patients is discharged from hospital, the Red Bag is packed with updated medical records, medications and personal items and taken back to the patient’s home, we where handover the bag to the care home team.

    We are the main transport link to this chain and play a key role in ensuring the bag is used and handed over at both ends of the patient’s journey.


    Clinical news

    Macmillam end of life care team

    End of Life Care teamSince August 2018, the charity, Macmillan, have been funding a two year programme to improve the palliative and end of life care service we provide to our patients. Our end of life care team who are delivering this scheme includes a nurse consultant, paramedic leads and an evaluation lead. The aim of the programme is to:

    • Enhance staff knowledge, confidence and wellbeing
    • Enhance patient and family/carer experience
    • Reduce inappropriate resuscitation attempts
    • Reduce inappropriate hospital conveyance
    • Enhance the quality of care provision

    From July this year, the team will be implementing an End of Life Care Coordinator network at each of our 18 ambulance station groups across London who will focus on improving this care provision at a local level. If you would like to get in touch with your local coordinator, please email [email protected]

    Coordinate my care

    Matt Hancock CMCCoordinate my Care (CMC) is now the only way we can access a patient’s care plan. If a 999 call is made the ambulance clinicians attending are notified that the plan is available to view, based on the patient’s address. CMC is suitable for any patient you feel would benefit from their care plan being communicated to our ambulance and control room staff as well as NHS 111 clinicians.

    Ambulance crews are able to view a patient’s care plan on scene, which can provide valuable information to guide clinical decision making. CMC is vital for ambulance clinicians as it provides key information about a patient that they will often have no pre-existing knowledge about. Ambulance clinicians can view your records of treatment escalation plans, patient’s wishes and important decisions that have been made, such as DNACPR status. This information can prevent inappropriate emergency department admissions and enables patients to be supported according to their needs and wishes.

    Since 1 April, we now hold all key clinical information about patients on CMC records and we no longer accept Patient Specific Protocols (PSP). We are currently checking all existing PSPs, and that process will be completed by 1st July 2019. GPs will be informed if we discover a patient who requires a PSP to be migrated to a CMC plan.

    Click here for more CMC training and guidance. 


    London Ambulance Service news

    Behind the Sirens podcast

    They’re on the roads 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, responding to over 9 million Londoners, but what really goes on behind the sirens? From major incidents to prank callers, our new podcast gives listeners a peak into the day to day lives of staff in one of the world’s busiest ambulance services.

    Join our host, Andrew as he delves into what happens behind the sirens at London Ambulance Service. He meets with our mental health team, chats with some of our paramedics and delves into what life is like in our 999 control room.

    You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts, or you can read more about the podcast and each episode here.

     

     

    Consultant Midwife receives national midwifery honour

    Amanda Mansfield Royal College MidwivesAmanda Mansfield, our Consultant Midwife, has received a national award from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) for her contribution to midwifery. Amanda received the honour at a ceremony at the Royal college of Midwives Education Conference in Bath and is the first midwife working in pre-hospital care to receive the fellowship.

    Commenting on receiving the award, Amanda said: “I feel so honoured to be the first pre-hospital midwife to be recognised with a RCM fellowship.”

    “For many women, pregnancy and birth are normal life events, however occasionally emergencies do occur and they need to be managed quickly to ensure the safety of both mother and baby. It has been a great privilege to work on developing this emergency care and also help improve the support and training for emergency service staff in this area.”

    Amanda leads a team of midwives who have developed and delivered pioneering educational resources for emergency services staff – from those working in the control room to patient facing clinicians. This improved training is helping to make sure mums and babies receive the best care for their needs.

    Amanda also led on the development and implementation of a pan-London pre-hospital Maternity Assessment and Screening tool, enabling clinicians to recognise when women who become unwell during pregnancy require emergency assistance.

    Amanda has been a midwife for over 30 years. Before her current role she worked as a strategic midwifery and maternity leader at the Royal Free Hospital in London and at Stoke Mandeville, Wycombe and Wexham Park Hospitals.


    Get in touch

    If you’d like to get in touch with us, or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]

  • North east London

    What’s happening in your area?

    Keeping ‘TRAC’ of conveyance outcomes across north east London

    North east London (NEL) has some of the busiest hospitals in the capital and, as a result, some of the highest ambulance handover delays. In order to support potential conveyance reduction, the Stakeholder Engagement Manager (SEM) in NEL STP has been working with the NEL Emergency Departments to try and identify avoidable conveyances by us and also third parties who may have arranged for conveyance by us – such as GPs, care and nursing homes and district nurses etc.

    The SEM was successful in securing funds from NEL partners to fund additional ED clinicians to take part in the reviews as this had been presented as a barrier to implementing the conveyance reviews.

    The conveyance review project named ‘TRAC’ – Team Reviewing Ambulance Conveyance – has been undertaken at Queens, King Georges, Newham, Whipps Cross and there are plans to work with the Homerton and Royal London. The TRAC staff have consisted of LAS Clinical Team Managers (CTMs), GPs, ED doctors, Senior Nurses, MIDOS staff and Alternative Care Pathway (ACP) providers. This has allowed a review of conveyances from a range of different skill sets and reviewed what we and the ED did in terms of diagnostics, diagnosis, treatment and patient outcome, alongside whether this could have been undertaken in the community through our ACPs, GP and 111 referrals etc.

    Going forward, the STP wants to find a method for EDs to flag avoidable conveyances through an easy and automated process. Allowing this feedback to reach those arranging conveyance in order that clinical reflection and future learning can support patient care.
    A full review of the data will be undertaken in due course once all reviews are complete to establish the wider learning for partners across the different agencies, to help promote ACPs, reduce avoidable conveyance and improve patient care.

     


    Clinical news

    Macmillam end of life care team

    End of Life Care teamSince August 2018, the charity, Macmillan, have been funding a two year programme to improve the palliative and end of life care service we provide to our patients. Our end of life care team who are delivering this scheme includes a nurse consultant, paramedic leads and an evaluation lead. The aim of the programme is to:

    • Enhance staff knowledge, confidence and wellbeing
    • Enhance patient and family/carer experience
    • Reduce inappropriate resuscitation attempts
    • Reduce inappropriate hospital conveyance
    • Enhance the quality of care provision

    From July this year, the team will be implementing an End of Life Care Coordinator network at each of our 18 ambulance station groups across London who will focus on improving this care provision at a local level. If you would like to get in touch with your local coordinator, please email [email protected]

    Coordinate my care

    Matt Hancock CMCCoordinate my Care (CMC) is now the only way we can access a patient’s care plan. If a 999 call is made the ambulance clinicians attending are notified that the plan is available to view, based on the patient’s address. CMC is suitable for any patient you feel would benefit from their care plan being communicated to our ambulance and control room staff as well as NHS 111 clinicians.

    Ambulance crews are able to view a patient’s care plan on scene, which can provide valuable information to guide clinical decision making. CMC is vital for ambulance clinicians as it provides key information about a patient that they will often have no pre-existing knowledge about. Ambulance clinicians can view your records of treatment escalation plans, patient’s wishes and important decisions that have been made, such as DNACPR status. This information can prevent inappropriate emergency department admissions and enables patients to be supported according to their needs and wishes.

    Since 1 April, we now hold all key clinical information about patients on CMC records and we no longer accept Patient Specific Protocols (PSP). We are currently checking all existing PSPs, and that process will be completed by 1st July 2019. GPs will be informed if we discover a patient who requires a PSP to be migrated to a CMC plan.

    Click here for more CMC training and guidance. 


    London Ambulance Service news

    Behind the Sirens podcast

    They’re on the roads 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, responding to over 9 million Londoners, but what really goes on behind the sirens? From major incidents to prank callers, our new podcast gives listeners a peak into the day to day lives of staff in one of the world’s busiest ambulance services.

    Join our host, Andrew as he delves into what happens behind the sirens at London Ambulance Service. He meets with our mental health team, chats with some of our paramedics and delves into what life is like in our 999 control room.

    You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts, or you can read more about the podcast and each episode here.

     

     

    Consultant Midwife receives national midwifery honour

    Amanda Mansfield Royal College MidwivesAmanda Mansfield, our Consultant Midwife, has received a national award from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) for her contribution to midwifery. Amanda received the honour at a ceremony at the Royal college of Midwives Education Conference in Bath and is the first midwife working in pre-hospital care to receive the fellowship.

    Commenting on receiving the award, Amanda said: “I feel so honoured to be the first pre-hospital midwife to be recognised with a RCM fellowship.”

    “For many women, pregnancy and birth are normal life events, however occasionally emergencies do occur and they need to be managed quickly to ensure the safety of both mother and baby. It has been a great privilege to work on developing this emergency care and also help improve the support and training for emergency service staff in this area.”

    Amanda leads a team of midwives who have developed and delivered pioneering educational resources for emergency services staff – from those working in the control room to patient facing clinicians. This improved training is helping to make sure mums and babies receive the best care for their needs.

    Amanda also led on the development and implementation of a pan-London pre-hospital Maternity Assessment and Screening tool, enabling clinicians to recognise when women who become unwell during pregnancy require emergency assistance.

    Amanda has been a midwife for over 30 years. Before her current role she worked as a strategic midwifery and maternity leader at the Royal Free Hospital in London and at Stoke Mandeville, Wycombe and Wexham Park Hospitals.


    Get in touch

    If you’d like to get in touch with us, or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]

  • South east London

    What’s happening in your area?

    Vulnerable persons vehicle

    Historically there has been a cohort of potentially vulnerable patients who, at times of high incoming demand to us, have waited longer for an ambulance than is ideal. This group of patients would include (but is not exclusive to) elderly fallers, patients who have taken an overdose, those in mental health crisis and patients with complex social needs. In the main these vulnerable patients will be assigned a low triage category which can delay our response.

    To enable us to effectively and safely manage these patients, our Clinical Hub (CHUB), a group of experienced paramedics and clinicians based at the two LAS control rooms, has medical oversight of these patients and monitor the ambulance dispatch queue of those who are deemed the most vulnerable. They are able to speak to the patients and are able to assess and triage their needs, as well as signpost patients to more suitable alternatives where appropriate.

    Having identified there is a small group of patients who have the potential to be at a higher risk, we have looked to alternative solutions in an effort to reduce risk and increase the patient experience. As a result of engagement with all groups of staff, a proposal was put forward to pilot an ambulance that is targeted specifically at this group of potentially vulnerable patients.

    In south east London we have been trialing a Vulnerable Person Vehicle which is based from within our Bromley ambulance station group. The initial pilot began in December and ran throughout most of the winter months with small breaks to enable time for review, reflection and modification. Following a successful pilot the vehicle has been running on a more permanent basis since 25 March .
    The vehicle is a fully equipped ambulance staffed with two clinicians and is operating 24/7, with the specific aim of assisting the CHUB in supporting the identified group of potentially vulnerable patients.

    We have seen an immediate success both in patient experience and a reduction in the time some of the vulnerable patients are waiting for an ambulance response. We have also seen that, as this group of patients are generally of a lower acuity, they are often suitable for a safe referral to an Appropriate Care Pathway (ACP). This might include a referral to the local RAPIDS Team, a conveyance to the local UCC rather than the ED, and also referrals to the our LAS Health response car. In April our crews attended 247 patients in south east London with 43% of those patients not requiring an ED conveyance.

     


    Clinical news

    Macmillam end of life care team

    End of Life Care teamSince August 2018, the charity, Macmillan, have been funding a two year programme to improve the palliative and end of life care service we provide to our patients. Our end of life care team who are delivering this scheme includes a nurse consultant, paramedic leads and an evaluation lead. The aim of the programme is to:

    • Enhance staff knowledge, confidence and wellbeing
    • Enhance patient and family/carer experience
    • Reduce inappropriate resuscitation attempts
    • Reduce inappropriate hospital conveyance
    • Enhance the quality of care provision

    From July this year, the team will be implementing an End of Life Care Coordinator network at each of our 18 ambulance station groups across London who will focus on improving this care provision at a local level. If you would like to get in touch with your local coordinator, please email [email protected]

    Coordinate my care

    Matt Hancock CMCCoordinate my Care (CMC) is now the only way we can access a patient’s care plan. If a 999 call is made the ambulance clinicians attending are notified that the plan is available to view, based on the patient’s address. CMC is suitable for any patient you feel would benefit from their care plan being communicated to our ambulance and control room staff as well as NHS 111 clinicians.

    Ambulance crews are able to view a patient’s care plan on scene, which can provide valuable information to guide clinical decision making. CMC is vital for ambulance clinicians as it provides key information about a patient that they will often have no pre-existing knowledge about. Ambulance clinicians can view your records of treatment escalation plans, patient’s wishes and important decisions that have been made, such as DNACPR status. This information can prevent inappropriate emergency department admissions and enables patients to be supported according to their needs and wishes.

    Since 1 April, we now hold all key clinical information about patients on CMC records and we no longer accept Patient Specific Protocols (PSP). We are currently checking all existing PSPs, and that process will be completed by 1st July 2019. GPs will be informed if we discover a patient who requires a PSP to be migrated to a CMC plan.

    Click here for more CMC training and guidance. 


    London Ambulance Service news

    Behind the Sirens podcast

    They’re on the roads 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, responding to over 9 million Londoners, but what really goes on behind the sirens? From major incidents to prank callers, our new podcast gives listeners a peak into the day to day lives of staff in one of the world’s busiest ambulance services.

    Join our host, Andrew as he delves into what happens behind the sirens at London Ambulance Service. He meets with our mental health team, chats with some of our paramedics and delves into what life is like in our 999 control room.

    You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts, or you can read more about the podcast and each episode here.

     

     

    Consultant Midwife receives national midwifery honour

    Amanda Mansfield Royal College MidwivesAmanda Mansfield, our Consultant Midwife, has received a national award from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) for her contribution to midwifery. Amanda received the honour at a ceremony at the Royal college of Midwives Education Conference in Bath and is the first midwife working in pre-hospital care to receive the fellowship.

    Commenting on receiving the award, Amanda said: “I feel so honoured to be the first pre-hospital midwife to be recognised with a RCM fellowship.”

    “For many women, pregnancy and birth are normal life events, however occasionally emergencies do occur and they need to be managed quickly to ensure the safety of both mother and baby. It has been a great privilege to work on developing this emergency care and also help improve the support and training for emergency service staff in this area.”

    Amanda leads a team of midwives who have developed and delivered pioneering educational resources for emergency services staff – from those working in the control room to patient facing clinicians. This improved training is helping to make sure mums and babies receive the best care for their needs.

    Amanda also led on the development and implementation of a pan-London pre-hospital Maternity Assessment and Screening tool, enabling clinicians to recognise when women who become unwell during pregnancy require emergency assistance.

    Amanda has been a midwife for over 30 years. Before her current role she worked as a strategic midwifery and maternity leader at the Royal Free Hospital in London and at Stoke Mandeville, Wycombe and Wexham Park Hospitals.


    Get in touch

    If you’d like to get in touch with us, or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]

  • South west London

    What is happening in your area?

    Blanket exchange trial at Kingston ED

    Kingston hoispital image

    Our south west London sector is participating in a blanket exchange trial, in conjunction with Kingston Hospital, Synergy Healthcare and Berendsen laundry companies. The trial features the use of a new style ‘gold’ blanket with green trim (which are larger than the current blankets we use).

    A secured locker has been situated in the sluice room at Kingston Hospital ED for our crews to exchange gold blankets on a one for one basis. The locker will be replenished by our partner laundry companies daily, and is accessed via Abloy (Drug room) key system. Where necessary, blankets can stay with patients, and hospital staff will transfer them to linen bins subsequently.

    These arrangements apply to Kingston only. For all other hospitals, it is business as usual, and both red and gold blankets should continue to be handled as per normal arrangements (i.e. disposed of via the red bins or on station).

     


    Clinical news

    Macmillam end of life care team

    End of Life Care teamSince August 2018, the charity, Macmillan, have been funding a two year programme to improve the palliative and end of life care service we provide to our patients. Our end of life care team who are delivering this scheme includes a nurse consultant, paramedic leads and an evaluation lead. The aim of the programme is to:

    • Enhance staff knowledge, confidence and wellbeing
    • Enhance patient and family/carer experience
    • Reduce inappropriate resuscitation attempts
    • Reduce inappropriate hospital conveyance
    • Enhance the quality of care provision

    From July this year, the team will be implementing an End of Life Care Coordinator network at each of our 18 ambulance station groups across London who will focus on improving this care provision at a local level. If you would like to get in touch with your local coordinator, please email [email protected]

    Coordinate my care

    Matt Hancock CMCCoordinate my Care (CMC) is now the only way we can access a patient’s care plan. If a 999 call is made the ambulance clinicians attending are notified that the plan is available to view, based on the patient’s address. CMC is suitable for any patient you feel would benefit from their care plan being communicated to our ambulance and control room staff as well as NHS 111 clinicians.

    Ambulance crews are able to view a patient’s care plan on scene, which can provide valuable information to guide clinical decision making. CMC is vital for ambulance clinicians as it provides key information about a patient that they will often have no pre-existing knowledge about. Ambulance clinicians can view your records of treatment escalation plans, patient’s wishes and important decisions that have been made, such as DNACPR status. This information can prevent inappropriate emergency department admissions and enables patients to be supported according to their needs and wishes.

    Since 1 April, we now hold all key clinical information about patients on CMC records and we no longer accept Patient Specific Protocols (PSP). We are currently checking all existing PSPs, and that process will be completed by 1st July 2019. GPs will be informed if we discover a patient who requires a PSP to be migrated to a CMC plan.

    Click here for more CMC training and guidance. 


    London Ambulance Service news

    Behind the Sirens podcast

    They’re on the roads 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, responding to over 9 million Londoners, but what really goes on behind the sirens? From major incidents to prank callers, our new podcast gives listeners a peak into the day to day lives of staff in one of the world’s busiest ambulance services.

    Join our host, Andrew as he delves into what happens behind the sirens at London Ambulance Service. He meets with our mental health team, chats with some of our paramedics and delves into what life is like in our 999 control room.

    You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts, or you can read more about the podcast and each episode here.

     

     

    Consultant Midwife receives national midwifery honour

    Amanda Mansfield Royal College MidwivesAmanda Mansfield, our Consultant Midwife, has received a national award from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) for her contribution to midwifery. Amanda received the honour at a ceremony at the Royal college of Midwives Education Conference in Bath and is the first midwife working in pre-hospital care to receive the fellowship.

    Commenting on receiving the award, Amanda said: “I feel so honoured to be the first pre-hospital midwife to be recognised with a RCM fellowship.”

    “For many women, pregnancy and birth are normal life events, however occasionally emergencies do occur and they need to be managed quickly to ensure the safety of both mother and baby. It has been a great privilege to work on developing this emergency care and also help improve the support and training for emergency service staff in this area.”

    Amanda leads a team of midwives who have developed and delivered pioneering educational resources for emergency services staff – from those working in the control room to patient facing clinicians. This improved training is helping to make sure mums and babies receive the best care for their needs.

    Amanda also led on the development and implementation of a pan-London pre-hospital Maternity Assessment and Screening tool, enabling clinicians to recognise when women who become unwell during pregnancy require emergency assistance.

    Amanda has been a midwife for over 30 years. Before her current role she worked as a strategic midwifery and maternity leader at the Royal Free Hospital in London and at Stoke Mandeville, Wycombe and Wexham Park Hospitals.


    Get in touch

    If you’d like to get in touch with us, or have any information you would like us to include in the next issue, please email us at [email protected]