Defib survivor transcript

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Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"Well, as I say it was a day like any other.  I’d done a day’s work, was working south of the river then in London and I’d walked to the main train station at London Bridge. And I was at the platform side waiting for the usual commuter special to get on with everyone else you know and apparently I had a cardiac arrest and collapsed."

Text displayed: Over 800 public-access defibrillators deployed in London.

Eddie McDermott, Shift Station Manager speaks:

"Well because I’m the first aider it’s our job to go and ascertain what the problem is. So we went over and I found Steve.  Actually sitting at this desk here when the call went across.  I made my way down the platform, so as I’m coming down it was more or less here.  Literally the door is here.  The train was packed, all the seats were full and the gentleman in question was sitting here.  He was just slumped and no movement from Steve at all.  He was going blue.  Tugged at the man’s shirt, head back, checked his breathing, not breathing, compressions, paddles on the man’s chest, shock advised, stand clear, shock, continued CPR...

Text displayed: With thousands of volunteers trained to use them.

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"This is real isn’t it?  And it was, it was real."

Eddie McDermott, Shift Station Manager speaks:

"You get into the zone.  It’s...you know if you had time to stop and look at it you’d be ‘oh my God I’ve got to do this’ but you just get into the zone, you get on with it.  Announcement went over the tannoy for any doctors and nurses on the station to attend."

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"That’s the first one, the first response was a paramedic on a motorbike."

Eddie McDermott, Shift Station Manager speaks:

"He just told me to carry on while he was sorting out his kit.  So he just told us to carry on with what we were doing and then to tell you the truth, it’s all a bit of a blur what goes on next."

Mark Whitbread, Consultant Paramedic speaks:

"So we have a huge databank of cardiac arrest information which allows us to plan, especially when we’re looking at putting defibrillators in to public places, which is a big initiative we’re involved with.  We know where to put the defibs because we know where the big footfalls are, we know where cardiac arrests occur and so it’s allowed us to plan."

Narrator speaks:

"How do we unite the 999 caller with AED?"

Martin Bullock, Community Defibrillation Officer speaks:

"Basically what we’re currently developing in London is an autodial system where when we get a 999 call in. All our defibrillator sites are going onto our EOC emergency operation centre database.  What will happen is when we get a 999 call in with the postcode on it, it will send an automated message to a nearby location saying there is an event at this location - can you please dispatch your defibrillator."

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"I do go past the defibrillator on the wall at London Bridge Station now and it does give me pause for thought every time I look at it and go past it.  I wouldn’t be here without that thing so yes, let’s get them, let’s get them everywhere – every school, every major office, every pub – that would be great."

Text displayed: It is London Ambulance Service’s goal to get AEDs in as many public places as possible.

Every minute you wait for an AED - 14% less chance of survival.

Martin Bullock, Community Defibrillation Officer speaks:

"So our biggest challenge was actually persuading people these machines are really safe.  We’re going to give you the training and support that you need.  So we started off small with a small amount of stations and we started to develop those.  Classically was London Bridge and where thankfully we’ve got a gentleman there who’s saved lots of lives now."

Eddie McDermott, Shift Station Manager speaks:

"No, I didn’t think I would actually use one but to get trained in one, why would you not want to learn something that could possibly save somebody’s life?"

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"And those are the people that I admire.  They don’t have to do it, they’re not paid to do it and I’ve been told by Eddie and others who use these things that it’s idiot proof, that you do what it says, you just follow the instructions and it all works out fine."

Martin Bullock, Community Defibrillation Officer speaks:

"It shows other people, actually anybody, can use these machines and now when we go to places and say would you like these machines, they grab it from us."

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"It’s life changing.  Even got me going to the gym on a regular basis and I certainly never did before."

Eddie McDermott, Shift Station Manager speaks:

"Check for breathing, apply the paddles, the machine will do the rest.  If you don’t try, the person could possibly die, so you know you’ve got nothing to lose."

Steven Hodder, cardiac arrest survivor speaks:

"Well I wouldn’t be here today without Eddie and what he did for me.  So I know how fortunate I was.  I chose a good place to collapse.  Thank you very much, you saved my life."

Text displayed: Would you know what to do if someone suffered from cardiac arrest?

Do you know where your closest public-access defibrillator is and how to use it?

Special thanks to London Ambulance Service.